Updated Cycling the Erie Canal guidebook available for purchase

The outstanding bicycling and sightseeing along the legendary Erie Canal is highlighted in the newly revised edition of Cycling the Erie Canal: A guide to 360 miles of adventure and history along the Erie Canalway Trail. The guidebook, now in its fifth edition, features updated routing information for nearly 100 new miles of trail constructed as part of the state’s Empire State Trail initiative, and up-to-date listings of lodgings, bike shops, and other services. The guidebook is published by Parks & Trails New York (PTNY), the leading statewide advocacy organization for parks and trails, in partnership with the New York State Canal Corporation.

Cycling the Erie Canal is a key resource for cyclists planning to bike the entire 360-mile Erie Canalway Trail between Buffalo and Albany, or for cyclists out for a day trip, as well walkers, in-line skaters, boaters, and auto travelers who want to enjoy the trail and the historic and cultural sites along the Canal Corridor.

The 144-page guidebook includes 38 easy-to-read, full-color maps that detail the trail route, as well as the things to see and do along the way, in addition to parks, museums, historic sites, and visitor centers, the maps indicate lodging and bike shops. Services such as restaurants, convenience stores, ATMs, pharmacies, post offices, hardware stores, and parking areas are also shown. 

Cycling the Erie Canal includes interpretive information about the history of the canal and tips for planning a trip. The guide features high-quality spiral binding, and its convenient 5” by 9” size is just right to tuck into a saddle bag, backpack, or glove compartment. 

Cycling the Erie Canal retails for $26.95, and Parks & Trails New York members enjoy a special discount price. It is available by visiting www.ptny.org/shop, and at bookstores, bike shops, museums, and gift shops throughout the Canal Corridor and beyond.

The 360-mile Erie Canalway Trail route runs east-west between Buffalo and Albany in upstate New York. It follows both active and historic sections of the Erie Canal, the renowned inland waterway that opened the frontier of the fledgling United States to settlement and commerce, transforming the nation in the process. 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s